2017 Industry Supported Sessions

 

 

These sessions are an opportunity for registered delegates to attend specific topics of interest and are developed by the CNSF and industry. Several are being held at lunch while others are later in the afternoon with refreshments. 

Pre-registration is required for each activity through the Congress registration process.

 

Tuesday, June 20, 2017    12:15 pm – 1:45 pm     Lunch ‘n Learn (unaccredited)

This program was developed by the CNSF and Novartis to achieve scientific integrity, objectivity and balance.  It is an unaccredited learning activity and not eligible for MOC credits. 

Innovation in Neuroscience

Course Chairs:  Sandra Black and David Li 

Course Description: 

New imaging techniques in MS:

A review of imaging techniques that are most immediately applicable in clinical MS practice.

Understanding Alzheimer’s disease:

Review the differential diagnosis of Dementia and discuss best applicable therapeutic strategies

 

Tuesday, June 20, 2017    12:15 pm – 1:45 pm     Lunch ‘n Learn (unaccredited)

This program was developed by the CNSF and Biogen to achieve scientific integrity, objectivity and balance.  It is an unaccredited learning activity and not eligible for MOC credits. 

Spinal muscular atrophy management update.

Course Chair:  Craig Campbell

Course Description: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare, autosomal-recessive, neuromuscular disease caused by deletion or mutation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. This gene is responsible for producing survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, which maintains the health and normal function of motor neurons.  Nusinersen is an antisense oligonucleotide that alters the SMN2 gene splicing to promote the production of full-length SMN protein and is currently under investigation for the treatment of SMA in Canada. This presentation will review the pathophysiology of SMA, as well as new insights on the treatment and management of SMA.

By the end of this course participants will:

  • Have an understanding of the clinical and pathophysiological aspects or spinal muscular atrophy
  • Have an understanding of the latest management and treatment strategies for SMA

 

Tuesday, June 20, 2017    4:15 pm – 5:45 pm      Sponsored session (unaccredited)

This program was developed by the CNSF and Sanofi Genzyme to achieve scientific integrity, objectivity and balance.  It is an unaccredited learning activity and not eligible for MOC credits. 

Panel Discussion – Accelerating Diagnosis of Neuromuscular Disorders

Course Chair:  Kristine Chapman

Course Description:  Pompe disease presents a diagnostic challenge for physicians due to the rarity, genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity and clinical overlap with other neuromuscular disorders, such as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), hereditary muscular dystrophies as well as hereditary and metabolic myopathies. Therefore, the diagnosis of Pompe disease is often delayed by years from onset of symptoms. Newer genetic testing, particularly those based on next generation sequencing, are valuable emerging tools to aid with the diagnostic challenge. This session will focus specifically on the opportunities and challenges of early and accurate diagnosis of patients with Pompe disease, with an emphasis on both clinical assessment and diagnostic tools.

 

By the end of this course participants will be able to:

  • Better understand the clinical characteristics and pathophysiology of Pompe disease 
  • Familiarize themselves with the differential diagnosis of limb-girdle muscle weakness (LGMW)
  • Integrate diagnostic strategies such as genetic panel testing in their clinical assessment of neuromuscular disease
  • Appreciate the need for multidisciplinary care in the management of neuromuscular disease

 

Wednesday, June 21, 2017    12:45 pm – 2:15 pm     Co-Developed session

This program was developed by the CNSF, Antibody Communications and Hoffmann-La Roche, and was planned to achieve scientific integrity, objectivity and balance.  

Changing the course of MS: high efficacy therapeutic options

Course ChairSarah Morrow & Fabrizio Giuliani

Course Description:   This program will explore the newest developments and approaches to its optimal management and the impact of early disease activity on long-term outcomes. It will critically evaluate the risk-benefit profile of current and emerging high efficacy therapies, and their impact on disease activity and progression. It will discuss the short therapeutic window to influence disease progression and worsening, and the importance of early, effective treatment in this regard. Through evidence-based and practical discussions with the panel, the program hopes to elucidate the future of MS therapy and the role newer agents may play in helping patients achieve optimal outcomes. 

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the impact of early disease activity on long-term outcomes in MS, and the need for early, effective treatment
  • Summarize the risk-benefit profile of current and emerging high efficacy therapies, and their impact on disease activity and progression
  • Discuss best practices for implementing high efficacy therapies for optimal therapeutic outcomes in MS

Wednesday, June 21, 2017    12:45 pm – 2:15 pm     Co-Developed session

This program was developed by the CNSF and Eli Lilly and was planned to achieve scientific integrity, objectivity and balance.  

Recent Advances in CSF analysis in Cognitive Impairment

Course Chair: Sandra Black

Course Description:

By the end of this course participants will be better able to:

  • Discuss CSF biomarkers in development.
  • Analyse the use of CSF biomarkers to identify patients with early-stage AD.
  • Discuss the limitations of current methods and potential role for Mass Spec in evaluating CSF levels of amyloid, tau and potentially other relevant proteins in people with cognitive impairment/dementia.

Outline: This co-developed session aims to discuss CSF biomarkers in development, their role in the diagnostic framework of AD and other dementias, and some methodological limitations.

Gap # 1:  Recent research is focused on biomarkers (CSF, Imaging) as ways to assess risk and achieve early identification of AD.  Practicing physicians have limited knowledge of recent advances in biomarker research.

Gap #2: Clinicians need to improve patterns of early diagnosis of AD and dementia, particularly as the number of those affected continues to rise.

Gap #3: While only symptomatic therapies are available, emerging disease-modifying agents (such as AB and tau-based therapies) are being vigorously pursued in clinical trials.  Clinicians need to be prepared for impending treatment approaches.

Thursday, June 22, 2017    11:45 am – 1:15 pm       Lunch ‘n Learn (unaccredited)

This program was developed by the CNSF and Sanofi Genzyme to achieve scientific integrity, objectivity and balance.  It is an unaccredited learning activity and not eligible for MOC credits. 

The Long Term Implications of Selecting an Oral Disease Modifying Therapy

Course Chair: Carolina Rush

Course Description:

  • Considering the long term data, what are the implications/considerations when selecting a first line oral agent?
  • How do oral DMT selections in the short term affect ‘switch’ choices in the long term?
  • How to decide between lateral switching vs. escalation considering the available long term data.

 

Thursday, June 22, 2017    4:00 pm – 5:30 pm   Sponsored session (unaccredited)

This program was developed by the CNSF and EMD Serono to achieve scientific integrity, objectivity and balance.  It is an unaccredited learning activity and not eligible for MOC credits. 

MS Duels Program

Course ChairMark Freedman

Course Description:  MS Duels is a debate style learning initiative that examines hot topics from 2 perspectives – allowing both the debaters and the participants to challenge their thinking around different areas pertaining to the management of MS.